Known Johnson

September 26, 2006

Special camera testing

Filed under: General — Tom @ 10:51 pm

Hey, I didn’t tell you all about the special testing I did to our new camera, did I? This is fantastic. Back in the middle of August, I decided that, since I was so happy with our new Casio Z600 that I’d do a little testing that I hadn’t seen anyone else do – shock testing. That’s right, I dropped the damned thing, one frickin’ month after buying it, and a mere two weeks before Amanda’s birthday, one of the very reasons we wanted the camera in the first place. It’s a great camera – very, very quick to start and focus (something my old camera, an otherwise wonderful and practically legendary Nikon Coolpix 995 was not) and takes nice snapshots. Alissa can actually use this camera without me having to show her how to deal with the many quirks of the 995. Plus nearly the entire back of the Z600 is taken up with the viewscreen, which makes it very easy to use – I was so used to squinting at my 995’s 1″ screen that it’s kind of a shock to this giant 2.7″ screen filling the back.

But back to my main point – I decided to really put the little Casio to the test completely inadvertently one day. I grabbed the camera to take it to the computer and apparently didn’t fully grasp it, took a few steps, swinging my arm as I did so, and the camera took flight, just a couple of feet and into the wall, where it plopped onto the carpet. I quickly grabbed it, flipped it on, and was relieved to see it working just fine – as I would hope from such an inconsequential fall. Again I bring up the specter of my 995 – it has taken a much worse beating in the past four years of service and never once balked.

However, two days later, I went to turn the camera on an found the screen nearly completely black, with one small, jagged triangle of bright white along the bottom edge of the Z600’s screen. My heart sank. Surely that little fall couldn’t have damaged it enough to cause this kind of destruction, right? Apparently it could. I called Casio and played innocent – I know, I know, it’s bad of me, but come on, ONE month and a little fall destroys the camera? I quickly packed the camera up and shipped it off to their repair place, The Time Machine, in California, who, Casio claimed, would turn the camera around in “10-14 business days.” And if there was a problem with the warranty coverage, I would have to cover it – as I would expect.

And sure enough, that next week a card arrived with minimal details but a shocking conclusion: $134.95 would return our camera to us in working condition. I reluctantly faxed off our payment information as requested and then waited, hoping the camera would come in the next week or so as promised.

The week came and went . . . and another, and another. And I’m still waiting – at the end of September. Amanda’s birthday was not a loss – it was covered by my parents’ borrowed digital camera. I called The Time Machine last week and was told that they had been waiting on the screen to arrive and that I should have my camera back by the end of this week. We’ll see. Had I known it would take this long, I would seriously have considered cutting my losses and buying another camera – from another manufacturer. As much as I like the camera, I have a very hard time believing that it’s acceptable for it to be that touchy that it can be virtually destroyed with one small fall like it suffered. Keep watching and see when the camera actually arrives . . .

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1 Comment »

  1. […] I’m really bad at following through, I admit it. I promised an update in this post about the camera repair situation and what happened? We got the camera back on time and I didn’t post an update. So here’s the update: we got the camera back on time (Friday, Sept. 29, in fact)! And it works like new! […]

    Pingback by Known Johnson | you guessed it, Frank Stallone! » Blog Archive » Special camera testing: the follow-up — October 3, 2006 @ 8:30 pm | Reply


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